| Subcribe via RSS

Dueling Twitter-Bots

November 19th, 2009 Posted in CPAN, Perl, Twitter

It looks as though I have some “competition” for my CPAN Twitter bot (@cpan_linked). The last few days I’ve been seeing posts from @cpanlive in my Perl search-column (I use Seesmic Desktop, with a permanent column for searches on “#perl“). This seems to be pretty much identical in intent to my bot, with some differences. I’ll cover those and what I think of them:

No URL-Shortening

Where I do URL-shortening (currently through TinyURL due to some down-time with Metamark, though I think they’re back up now), @cpanlive doesn’t. I believe that if the status message were to exceed 140 characters, Twitter would notice this and scan the message for URLs to shorten automatically. In the end, I suppose it’s a matter of taste– with @cpanlive you’ll see the actual URL the majority of the time.

Content

I usually provide two links, the second being to the “Changes” (Changes, ChangeLog, etc.) file, or the README if I can’t find a change-log. @cpanlive provides just the main link. I also include the author’s name. This goes back to the use of URL-shortening– I’m careful to keep my status under 140 characters, but having pre-shortened the links gives me more room to play with.

Hash-Tagging

I don’t use any hash-tags, currently. @cpanlive uses both “#Perl” and “#CPAN”. On the one hand, I probably wouldn’t have even known about this if it weren’t for the tagging, as I wouldn’t have seen it otherwise. On the other hand, this puts a lot of data from a single bot into the #perl search-stream. Most people know to follow a given bot if they want CPAN stream updates, and would prefer to not have them cluttering up #perl.

That said, I am considering adding #CPAN to the updates that @cpan_linked puts out, as well as the re-write that I’m (slowly) working on. I think that such data is more useful to users searching on #CPAN than those searching on #Perl.

Speed and Pacing

When @cpan_linked gets a cluster of several CPAN updates at once, it tries to spread them out over the next period between polls of search.cpan.org‘s RDF feed. Currently, I poll it every 15 minutes, so if I get 5 new items to post they get posted roughly 3 minutes apart. It looks like @cpanlive doesn’t do anything like this, as the updates seem be in “clumps”, which is what I was trying to avoid. Again, a matter of taste. I didn’t want the bot to suddenly spew 10-20 updates into my Twitter stream, pushing everything else “below the fold” as it were. Other followers might not care one way or the other.

Something I’ve noticed, though, is that @cpanlive seems to be about an hour or so behind @cpan_linked, on average. I assume that they’re polling the RDF source hourly, rather than the 15-minute interval I use.

Conclusion

Well, there’s no “conclusion” here, really. I mean, it’s not like I have an exclusive license to relay CPAN releases to Twitter. If such an exclusive right existed, it wouldn’t be mine in the first place! I do wonder about the reason for doing it over again, though it may just be someone’s project for learning how to use the Net::Twitter modules. It does push me to get cracking on my re-write, though, as I have other features planned that should make it even more useful.

Tags: , ,

2 Responses to “Dueling Twitter-Bots”

  1. fooNo Gravatar Says:

    Your program butchers the author names. For example, look at Catalyst-Helper-Model-Email-0.03 from 2009-11-25.


  2. rjrayNo Gravatar Says:

    The app does what it can with the data it is given in the RDF feed. Some authors have set their names in encodings that search.perl.org doesn’t re-encode to UTF-8 correctly. Not much I can do when I get that data.


Leave a Reply